THE SULTRY ENCHANTMENT OF WATERCOLOR 

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REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST (J.K. Murtha)

If I were to mention names like van Gogh, Geogia Okeefe or Dean Mitchell; for those familiar, the light bulb flashes will blow up in their minds, for I am talking about famous watercolor painters. 

The 20th century witnessed the advent of acrylic painters. Acrylic allows for more versatility; the artist /painter, can use this on multiple surfaces, paper, wood, canvas, glass, metal, plastic

ALINA KURBIEL (Naval Academy Chapel)

The watercolor artist is “more or less” limited to a white surface; however, the next day, that landscape or portrait can be changed with relative ease, unlike the acrylic painter.

KAYAKS (April Rimpo)

Hence the watercolor artist/painter, spends enormously more time at the craft than the acrylic artist; removing that upturned lip in the portrait; catching that subtle shade, the moment the cloud passed over the mountain top, the froth at the top of the wave in the Atlantic Ocean. Sultry enchantment.

 

FLASH of SUMMER (Julia Rogers)

Through December 4th, 2021, the Baltimore Watercolor Society enjoined with several acrylic artists to display their new works, at the McBride Gallery, on Main Street, in Annapolis MD. I made an appearance. 

LADY in RED (Victor Nizovtsev) acrylic
SERENITY (Victor Nizovtsev) acrylic

THE LANGUAGE OF SOUL 

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A summer’s Day

WHEN ONE TALKS ABOUT THE “SOUL” OF A MAN; MORE OFTEN THAN NOT, IT REFERS TO THE CONSCIENCE of the BEING; THE MOTIVATION.

THEN THERE IS THE RELIGIOUS INTERPRETATION OF “SOUL”. Some BELIEVE THE SOUL DIES, while others, that the soul is immortal

MY SOUL

Outside of philosophy and in particular religion, “SOUL” is often spoken of in the context of ART. 

This is more apparent, because whether it be music, poetry, still or performing art, it is how that individual or the collective see life or have experienced it. 

SOUL BROTHERS
SOUL SISTA

In this edition you are looking with me at two women, who have decided to place their language of “SOUL” on public display. 

I’M EVERY WOMAN

First, MEGAN LEWIS. She wanted to share her “joys, frustrations and prideful moments of Black women”. For that, her “language of soul” became her emotional expose: the thickness of black women: lips, noses, eyes, and the unabashedness with which black women embrace color. Too dark for Yellow or Fuchsia! Not anymore! 

LGBTQ?

Next is Mayble LEE, A JAZZ DANCER AND SINGER, born in Atlanta Georgia. And what is she to Baltimore, MD.? 

For this, welcome the voice of DEREK PRICE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, EUBIE BLAKE CULTURAL CENTER: 

These two exhibitions are currently at the EUBIE BLAKE CENTER, on HOWARD STREET, in Baltimore MD. 

HENRI MATISSE REVISTS BALTIMORE 

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MATISSE , on the lake in France

It is hard to believe that a man coming from a rich background, who later studied law, gave it all up for the “love of art”. 

As can be imagined, he felt the askance look of his parents, who probably said in local parlance, “what the heck?!” 

MATISSE (his curvaceous model)

Without their blessing he went back to Paris to study art. The magic did not envelop until he was introduced to the works of the now famous Van Gogh, who loved portraits. This became MATISSE’s raison d’tre. He later, had a child with one of his models, got married to an aristocrat, with whom he had several children. 

MATISSE (in living color)

This fascination with the female body form apparently made him popular with women, among whom were the socialite CONE sisters of Baltimore Md., CLARIBEL and ETTA. As MATISSE rose in popularity, he became more than an artist to the CONES, they were friends, so much so that he was invited to Baltimore by the sisters, and it is believed, he generated the attention to that of a rock star visiting the Meyerhoff Concert Hall. 

MATISSE is again in Baltimore, starting this month (October 2021) at the BMA.

ETTA CONE by HENRI MATISSE
MATISSE interpretation of Jazz.

MATISSEE DIED AT 85, in 1954, at the height of the Jazz era. He was impressed.